www.rockandrollhoteldc.com#dapoxetine, http://www.rockandrollhoteldc.com, http://www.rockandrollhoteldc.com/cheapest-place-to-buy/bactrim-without-prescription.html#bactrim, http://www.rockandrollhoteldc.com, www.rockandrollhoteldc.com, http://www.rockandrollhoteldc.com/cheapest-place-to-buy/propecia-without-prescription.html#propecia, www.rockandrollhoteldc.com, http://www.rockandrollhoteldc.com, www.rockandrollhoteldc.com, http://www.rockandrollhoteldc.com/cheapest-place-to-buy/finpecia-without-prescription.html, www.rockandrollhoteldc.com
Print

Latest News


New medicine that has been shown to help patients with painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy

Palexia Sustained Release (SR) is a medication indicated for management of moderate to severe chronic pain unresponsive to non-narcotic analgesics. It has two mechanisms of action: it is part mu-opioid agonist and part noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor. 

Three pivotal randomised, double-blind clinical studies in osteoarthritis and lower back pain have shown that Palexia SR provided similar efficacy from chronic pain as oxycodone controlled release (OxyContin), but with superior gastrointestinal tolerability (p<0.001) (Lange B, Kuperwasser B et al.  Adv Ther. 2010;27:381-99). The incidences of specific gastrointestinal treatment emergent adverse events were statistically lower for tapentadol compared with oxycodone including incidences of constipation, nausea and vomiting and the composite of nausea and vomiting. A higher percentage of patients discontinued treatment on oxycodone (62%) compared with tapentadol (44%).

In addition, a 12-week randomised clinical study in patients with painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy has also shown that Palexia SR is statistically significantly better than placebo at reducing pain in this group of patients (p=0.032) (Schwartz S, Etropolski M, et al. Curr Med Res Opin. 2011;27:151-62). 

Submissions to the PBAC to list Palexia SR on the PBS


Three submissions for the listing of Palexia SR on the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS) for chronic severe pain not responding to non-narcotic analgesia (the same listing as other opioids for chronic pain listed on the PBS) have been submitted and subsequently rejected by the Pharmaceutical Benefits Advisory Committee (PBAC) (http://www.health.gov.au/internet/main/publishing.nsf/Content/pbac-psd-tapentadol-march11; http://www.health.gov.au/internet/main/publishing.nsf/Content/pbac-psd-tapentadol-march12; http://www.health.gov.au/internet/main/publishing.nsf/Content/pbacrec-july12-subseq).  Each was rejected on the basis of uncertain clinical benefit or clinical need, and uncertain ‘cost-effectiveness’.  Regarding the latest rejection in July 2012, the PBAC stated that:

'The PBAC notes that there are many products for the management of severe pain already listed on the PBS, and therefore it is difficult to determine whether there is significant clinical need for tapentadol'

A fourth submission for PBS listing was submitted in August 2012 and will considered at the November 2012 meeting of the PBAC. 

How can consumers comment on the Palexia SR submission?


The PBAC agenda for the November 2012 PBAC meeting, including Palexia SR (tapentadol SR) on the items for discussion, will be published online from September 26 via the following link: (http://www.health.gov.au/internet/main/publishing.nsf/Content/PBAC-Meeting-Agenda-and-Consumer-Comments-lp). 

Consumers have the opportunity to provide online comments on submissions from September 26 to October 10 via the following link:

http://www.health.gov.au/internet/main/publishing.nsf/Content/PBAC_online_submission_form


Peripheral Herpetic Neuralgia (PHN) – a consequence of Shingles

 

PHN is a common, but not well-known complication of shingles. PHN is pain that persists after the rash from shingles has healed and can last for years.[i] The nature of PHN varies and can range in duration from a few minutes to constant, on a daily or almost daily basis.[ii]

 

The risk and severity of PHN increases with age, particularly in otherwise healthy adults aged over 50. [iii]  Up to 50% of older Australians with shingles may develop PHN[iv], which often does not respond to treatment and can have a devastating impact on quality of life including disruption of sleep, mood, work and everyday activities.ii

 

Shingles is caused by a reactivation of herpes zoster, the virus which causes chickenpox.ii Each year, more than 97,000 cases of shingles are diagnosed, and in Australians aged 50 and over, the disease is responsible for an estimated 139,000 GP visits and 4,000 hospitalisations, at a cost to the community of more than $32 million per year.iii

 

Whilst everyone who has experienced chickenpox is at risk of developing shingles, age is the most important risk factor.iii The most significant increase in shingles prevalence occurs between the ages of 50–60, and continues upwards thereafter.iii By 85 years, one in two Australians will have experienced shingles.i

 

There is currently no cure for shingles and subsequent PHN. Available treatment options include antiviral medicines, which aim to shorten the length of shingles infection, as well as pain medicines, antidepressants and topical creams to help relieve long-term pain. No current therapy option has been shown to prevent PHN developing, and even with optimal antiviral therapy the risk of PHN developing remains substantial.iii,[v],[vi]

 



[i] NHMRC. (2008). The Australian Immunisation Handbook, 9th Edition: 3.26 (329-331).

[ii]           Centre for Disease Control and Prevention. (2008). Prevention of herpes zoster. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report; Vol 57: 2008;57, June 6th, pp1-30.

[iii] Stein A N. et al. (2009). Herpes zoster burden of illness and health care resource utilisation in the Australian population aged 50 years and older. Vaccine. Vol 27, pp. 520-29.

[iv] Cunningham AL et al. (2008). The prevention and management of herpes zoster. MJA vol 188, no.3, pp171-176.

[v] Schmander KE, Dworkin RH. (2008). Natural history and treatment of herpes zoster. J Pain 2008;9(1 Suppl 1 (January)):S3-9.

[vi] Oxman MN et al. (2005). A vaccine to prevent herpes zoster and post-herpetic neuralgia in the United Kingdom. Epidemiol Infect 2008 May 9:1-10


New pain program in Sydney - a whole person approach based on new thinking in pain

(continued from home page) Philip has been working in the field of pain management for over 25 years and is also a teacher and researcher at the University of Sydney. The team also includes a physiotherapist - Rebecca McCabe - and clinical psychologist - Dr Robin Murray. Both have many years experience working both in hospital pain managements centres as well as private practice. The new service provides assessment, individual treatment including medications, physiotherapy, hydrotherapy, clinical psychology and a group Pain Program. The group program runs for 3 hours a week over 6 weeks with some follow up sessions.

Classification: Tier 2 Pain Management Service PMS

 Facility Details

Greenwich Hospital Pain Clinic

River Road

Greenwich NSW 2065

 Tel 02 9903 8333

fax 02 9437 4829

Email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

web www.hammond.com.au/services/pain-management


An Aussie first: Chronic Pain raised in Federal House of Reps

The impact of chronic pain on the life of an Australian raised in the House of Reps Australian Federal Government by Louise Markus, member for Macquarie:

Here is the transcript:

"National Pain Week
National Carers Week


Mrs MARKUS (Macquarie) (13:57):  I rise today to draw  attention  to  National  Pain  Week,  which will occur during the parliamentary winter break from 22 to 28  July,  and  National  Carers  Week,  which  occurred last  week.  These  two  important  weeks  are  obviously connected,  given  that  Australian  carers  often  makes sacrifices  to  care  and  support  those  who  are experiencing pain.

Earlier  this  month,  I  met  with  a  resident  from  the electorate of Macquarie, Andrea Downing, who suffers from  chronic  pain  on  a  daily  basis.  As  a  result  of  this chronic  pain,  Ms  Downing  faces  daily  challenges. Many like Ms Downing have reduced opportunities for work,  having  to  opt  for  cheaper  accommodation  in locations such as the Blue Mountains, where access to health services and suitable transport is limited.  Following  my  meeting  with  Ms  Downing  I  have reviewed  what  I  consider  to  be  startling  statistics  with regard  to  pain  that  will  be  broadly  advertised  during National  Pain  Week.  One  in  five  Australians  suffer from chronic pain. Eighty per cent of those—that is, 16 per  cent  of  the  national  population—do  not  have adequate  access  to  treatment  for  their  pain.  Chronic pain  is  a  very  real  and  debilitating  illness  resulting  in loss and a lot of misunderstanding. It is a real condition that  can  manifest  itself  under  a  variety  of  banners  and requires thorough recognition as a disability.
It  is  absolutely  critical  that  people  with  a  disability and  their  families  and  carers  are  provided  with  the regular  care,  support  and  therapy  equipment  that  they need.  Effectively,  this  government  will  pend  more each  financial  year  on  its  interest  repayments  than  it will  spend  in  total  over  the  next  four  years  on  the implementation  of  the  National  Disability  Insurance Scheme. You can forgive Australian people such as Ms Downing  for  feeling  short-changed  because  of  the government's approach to chronic pain."


Chronic Pain Australia is hosting Australia's National Pain Week 2012.

July 22nd - 28th 2012

We have started working towards National Pain Week. We have now published the aims and objectives for the week. Its all about  bringing to community awareness the dilemma for people in pain, reducing stigma, promoting recent knowledge about pain and at the same time hopefully having some fun.  Read more

Soon we will be developing a new facility on the site to enable people to register their events and there will be some wonderful interactivity going on. 

To register your expression of interest please email us This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.


Medicines being considered for PBS subsidy in March 2012: YOU NEED TO ACT NOW - FEB 8 deadline.

Many of our members have told us that they cannot afford medicines that help them. You have a chance to make a difference in making these medicines available through the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS) system, a government subsidised scheme which aims to level the playing field so that all Australians regardless of their financial or any other capacity are able to afford helpful medicinesThere are three medicines that are important for people in pain on the agenda for the Pharmaceutical Benefits Advisory Committee meeting in March 2012. These are Lyrica, Naproxen and Palexia. Take a moment to study these agenda items below. If you take any of these or think that they should be subsidised, you have a chance to make an online submission at :

http://www.health.gov.au/internet/main/publishing.nsf/Content/PBAC_online_submission_form

 

 

Re-submission

(Major submission)

Pregabalin, capsule, 25 mg, 75 mg, 150 mg and 300 mg, Lyrica®

Pfizer Australia Pty Ltd

Neuropathic (nerve) pain

Re-submission for Authority Required (Streamlined) listings for:

1. Initiation and up-titration of treatment for neuropathic pain (75 mg)
2. Initiation of treatment for neuropathic pain in patients requiring a reduced dose due to renal impairment (25 mg)
3. Continuation of treatment in patients who have received a PBS prescription for initiation of treatment and have shown an adequate clinical response (all strengths)
4. Continuation of treatment in patients who had shown clinical response to pregabalin prior to PBS listing (all strengths)

 

Re-submission

(Major submission)

Naproxen with esomeprazole, tablet 500 mg -20 mg (as magnesium trihydrate), Vimovo®

AstraZeneca Pty Ltd

Arthritis

Re-submission for a Restricted Benefit listing for the symptomatic treatment of osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis or ankylosing spondylitis in a patient who requires a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug and is at high risk of developing gastrointestinal complications.

 

Re-submission

(Major submission)

Tapentadol, tablet, 50 mg, 100 mg, 150 mg, 200 mg and 250 mg (as hydrochloride) (sustained release), Palexia SR®

CSL Limited

Chronic severe pain

Re-submission for a Restricted Benefit listing for the treatment of chronic severe disabling pain not responding to non-narcotic analgesics.

You can see the whole agenda at:

http://www.pbs.gov.au/info/industry/listing/elements/pbac-meetings/pbac-agenda


Neurodynmics and the Neuromatrix Conference

A unique professional opportunity for alll involved in rehabilitation has evolved.

In April, 2012, a conference which rigorously engages the brain and the immune systems to inform the future of rehabilitation will be held at the Adeliade Convention Centre.

An extraordinary list of speakers for a rehabilitation conference has been assembled. But critically, this material, some of of it futuristic, has to be taken to the clinical battlefron - here we offer lunchtime education and 22 workshops to select from. This includes the use of aart, movement, mindfulness, health coaching, therapeutic narraatives, deep neuroscience, exercise, plevic pain, spirituality, hands on techniques, graded imagery, cooking for pain, daance, illusions and nerve mobilisation.

This is a very different conference in concert aand mode of education. It is relevant to ll health professionals who want to maintain best current practices. It's aa generous package which includs three, full, intense, entertaining days of intellectual noursihment, a dinner with some very different entertainment, Nerdy Passions and a bit of time fr fun.

We have just completed aa website update of all this information aand more, some of which has beeen based on audience feedback.

Keep an eye on www.noi2012.com for futher announcements.

We look forward to sseeing you in April!

 

Invitation to particpate in helpful online program through St vincents in Sydney

St Vincents writes:
"We are writing to inform you that applications for 2 new programs are now open:
-    The Worry and Sadness program (for Generalised Anxiety Disorder GAD and depression); and
-    The Panic program.
The Worry and Sadness Program is designed to help people with Generalised Anxiety Disorder (GAD) and/or depression learn to gain control over their symptoms.
The Panic Program is designed to help people with Panic Disorder learn to gain control over their symptoms.
We would encourage you to visit www.virtualclinic.org.au to read more about both programs.
Both programs will begin in mid-late October 2011. The Worry and Sadness Program is about to begin, so if you're interested please apply as soon as possible to ensure your place!
The Worry and Sadness Program will operate for 8-10 weeks, and the Panic Program for 6-8 weeks. During that time participants will receive free access to the lessons and summary sheets, and extra materials, including real-life stories about the experiences of other people with issues similar to their own who have completed previous VirtualClinic programs.
 
Please note that this is a clinical trial. In this trial all participants will get full access to either the Worry and Sadness Program or the Panic Program, depending on the program you choose. If you apply, you will be randomly allocated to one of the 2 following groups:

1. Full access to the selected program + regular email and/or phone contact from the VirtualClinic Team.
2. Full access to the selected program in January 2012 + regular email and/ or phone contact from the Virtual Clinic Team.

We expect that the results for people in both conditions will be similar after they have completed the program – the purpose of havin g two groups start at different times is to help us better understand how effective the Program is. In order to get the most out of this Program it is important that you are prepared to work hard. That means reading each lesson, and reading (and doing) the homework. The harder you work the more benefit you are likely to experience. Our experience with over 1500 participants in our trials is that those who can realistically commit 4 hours/week make the most progress.

To make an application, please visit www.virtualclinic.org.au. After you have read all the material on that site, please click on the ‘Apply’ button (applications are first made on-line). Once we receive your application we will send you a confirmation email. If your application is successful we will telephone you to complete the application process with a diagnostic interview. If you want to apply please do so soon, as we have a very large waiting list, and have limited places available.

If you would like us to keep your name on the waiting list for another program, please email us to let us know. We will be clearing names from the waiting list unless we hear from you.

Alternatively, you can go and seek help now from one of our programs via CRUfADClinic www.crufadclinic.org. You can do this in one of two ways: either get a prescription from your clinician (eg GP or Psychologist); or get a referral from your clinician (eg GP or Psychologist). It will cost you $44, whereas participating in the clinical trial is free. See CRUfADClinic www.crufadclinic.org for more details.
 
We look forward to receiving your application.  And, please don't hesitate to contact us with any questions, before or after applying.
 
Kind regards,
 

Professor Gavin Andrews
The VirtualClinic Team
www.virtualclinic.org.au

 

Draft outcomes from a "consumer perspective" of a model of service delivery in NSW.

 

The NSW Government has demonstrated interest in improving models of service delivery for people in pain in NSW. Thank you if you commented and participated in the survey. I will keep you up to date on progress on the model of care proposed for NSW.

Coralie

 

Women's Advocates Confront “Silent and Costly Epidemic” Of Chronic Pain 

Updated Report Identifies Cost Saving Solutions

WASHINGTON, DC – June 24, 2011 – The Campaign to End Chronic Pain in Women (“the Campaign”) today released its 2011 health care policy recommendations, which could save the government billions of dollars in wasted healthcare costs each year. This update to the Campaign’s groundbreaking 2010 report – Chronic Pain in Women: Neglect, Dismissal and Discrimination – offers recommendations in advance of a major, new, Congressionally-mandated study and recommendations on pain to be released by the Institute of Medicine (IOM) on June 29, 2011.

“Up to 50 million American women suffer from one or more chronic pain conditions. Our country’s failure to support research and train medical professionals in the appropriate diagnosis and treatment of these conditions adds as much as $80 billion a year in direct and indirect costs to American taxpayer’s health care bill,” said Terrie Cowley, President of the TMJ Association, one of the four organizations leading the Campaign.   

“Chronic pain is a silent and very costly epidemic. The good news is that solutions would not only improve the lives of millions who suffer, but they would also cut health costs and improve economic productivity,” added Kim McCleary, President and CEO of the CFIDS Association of America, one of the four organizations leading the Campaign. 

After a successful inaugural year of the Campaign, the 2011 recommendations include:

  • The National Institutes of Health should expand, better coordinate and focus federally supported research on chronic pain conditions which solely or disproportionately impact women, including chronic fatigue syndrome, endometriosis, fibromyalgia, interstitial cystitis, temporomandibular (TMJ) disorders and vulvodynia.
  • Using the latest scientific information on the diagnoses, treatment and prevention of these disorders, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, with support from and in collaboration with other federal agencies, should launch an aggressive multi-year campaign to appropriately educate health care professionals, as well as patients and the lay public.
  • Federal health agencies involved in pain care, education and research should improve coordination and resource-sharing to ensure information sharing, replication of best practices, and elimination of overlap and duplication.

To read the full text of the report and all of the recommendations, visit http://www.endwomenspain.org.

“As a Campaign, we are proud to have participated in the national conversation about pain throughout the past year, and will continue to offer recommendations that [1]we hope will continue to be  implemented at the highest levels of government,” said Christin Veasley, Executive Director, National Vulvodynia Association, one of the four organizations leading the Campaign. “We are pleased that the IOM completed its pain study in such a timely manner and look forward to working with all levels of government to implement vital recommendations that will improve the lives of millions of pain sufferers.”

The IOM’s report on our nation’s status of pain care, education and research will be released on June 29, 2011

About The Campaign to End Chronic Pain in Women:

The Campaign to End Chronic Pain in Women is an advocacy campaign fighting to end discrimination and improve care for women suffering from chronic pain. The Campaign is led by organizational leaders from the CFIDS Association of America, Endometriosis Association, National Vulvodynia Association, and The TMJ Association. For more information, visit www.EndWomensPain.org.

 

The tip of the iceberg

A new report has found that one in three older Australians currently experience chronic pain. Alarmingly, a significant proportion of the older population will also commit suicide as a result. The Pfizer Health Report on Chronic Pain released today, found that around 29 per cent of adults aged 66 and over experience chronic pain. President of Chronic Pain Australia, Coralie Wales, said that although this figure was accurately obtained it does not represent the true size of the problem, especially in the 80-plus age group.

Many chronic pain sufferers ponder suicide.

The Australian, 7 June 2011

A NATIONAL study on chronic pain shows a third of the population suffers from the malady and, of those, 20 per cent have considered suicide and 5 per cent have attempted to take their lives. Chronic Pain Australia president Coralie Wales, who commissioned the study of 2500 people, said most sufferers also felt stigmatised, believing they were perceived as drug addicts or bludgers. "The more stigmatised you feel, the more likely you are to commit suicide," she said. Read more

 

iPhone app a good vehicle for Chronica

We are delighted to announce the arrival of Chronica, a brilliant new tool for people living with chronic pain. Gianna, one of our members, has been working on this app for some time and, with her partner Chris, has launched Chronica onto the market. It is already getting postive feedback from people in pain. Chronic Pain Australia has a forum for people using the app. It is important that we share tips and strategies on how to optimally use Chronica, as there are really useful customisable fields and the potential for tracking many aspects of daily life and how they impact upon pain is only limited by the imagination. For example, are there certain foods which have an effect? Why not go to the forum and share your experiences...

Peripheral Herpetic Neuralgia (PHN) – a consequence of Shingles

 

PHN is a common, but not well-known complication of shingles. PHN is pain that persists after the rash from shingles has healed and can last for years.[i] The nature of PHN varies and can range in duration from a few minutes to constant, on a daily or almost daily basis.[ii]

 

The risk and severity of PHN increases with age, particularly in otherwise healthy adults aged over 50. [iii]  Up to 50% of older Australians with shingles may develop PHN[iv], which often does not respond to treatment and can have a devastating impact on quality of life including disruption of sleep, mood, work and everyday activities.ii

 

Shingles is caused by a reactivation of herpes zoster, the virus which causes chickenpox.ii Each year, more than 97,000 cases of shingles are diagnosed, and in Australians aged 50 and over, the disease is responsible for an estimated 139,000 GP visits and 4,000 hospitalisations, at a cost to the community of more than $32 million per year.iii

 

Whilst everyone who has experienced chickenpox is at risk of developing shingles, age is the most important risk factor.iii The most significant increase in shingles prevalence occurs between the ages of 50–60, and continues upwards thereafter.iii By 85 years, one in two Australians will have experienced shingles.i

 

There is currently no cure for shingles and subsequent PHN. Available treatment options include antiviral medicines, which aim to shorten the length of shingles infection, as well as pain medicines, antidepressants and topical creams to help relieve long-term pain. No current therapy option has been shown to prevent PHN developing, and even with optimal antiviral therapy the risk of PHN developing remains substantial.iii,[v],[vi]

 



[i] NHMRC. (2008). The Australian Immunisation Handbook, 9th Edition: 3.26 (329-331).

[ii]           Centre for Disease Control and Prevention. (2008). Prevention of herpes zoster. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report; Vol 57: 2008;57, June 6th, pp1-30.

[iii] Stein A N. et al. (2009). Herpes zoster burden of illness and health care resource utilisation in the Australian population aged 50 years and older. Vaccine. Vol 27, pp. 520-29.

[iv] Cunningham AL et al. (2008). The prevention and management of herpes zoster. MJA vol 188, no.3, pp171-176.

[v] Schmander KE, Dworkin RH. (2008). Natural history and treatment of herpes zoster. J Pain 2008;9(1 Suppl 1 (January)):S3-9.

[vi] Oxman MN et al. (2005). A vaccine to prevent herpes zoster and post-herpetic neuralgia in the United Kingdom. Epidemiol Infect 2008 May 9:1-10